Roger W. Smith, “Reminscence of Eiji Mizutani” (ロジャーW.スミス、「水谷栄二さんを偲んで」)

 

 

‘Reminiscence of Eiji Mizutani

 

(Downloadable Word document is posted above.)

 

 

(ダウンロード可能なWord文書が上に掲載されています)

下記の日本語訳をご覧ください

 

 

*************************************************

 

 

Roger W. Smith, “Reminscence of Eiji Mizutani” (ロジャーW.スミス、「水谷栄二さんを偲んで」)

 

 

Eiji Mizutani (水谷 栄二), a former colleague of mine at Watson Wyatt Worldwide, passed away in Tokyo on January 30, 2006.

Mr. Mizutani was the manager of the Wyatt Company’s Tokyo office. During the 1990’s, he divided his time between Tokyo and New York and was involved in initiatives to establish new business for the Wyatt Company with Japanese clients both in Japan and the United States.

I was employed in Business Development and Mr. Mizutani was interested in recruiting me to work with potential Japanese client firms.

Unfortunately, not much ever came of this. But Mr. Mizutani arranged for me to go to Tokyo on a business trip and paid for the trip with a plane ticket purchased with his frequent flier miles. It was thanks to him that I got to see Japan. He was keenly interested in my trip and gave me advice on what to do and see and whom to meet with.

I spent a great deal of time in New York with Mr. Mizutani, both at the office and in causal encounters.

I had great respect and affection for Mr. Mizutani. He was a wonderful person. He was intelligent and well informed in so many areas: business, languages, and general knowledge. He was interested in many things. In fact, it seems he was interested in just about everything. We talked about many subjects, ranging from business to sports. He was an avid sports fan.

He told me about his childhood and his education in Vietnam and the United States. He was a modest man with an impressive background. Apparently, much of his early education was in Vietnam, and he attended college in the United States during the 1950’s, I believe in Indiana.

He knew three languages fluently: Japanese, English, and Vietnamese. His English was impeccable.

He once told me, which I found surprising and interesting, that Vietnamese was an even more difficult language to learn than Chinese.

Mr. Mizutani was a kind person. He seemed to enjoy life greatly.

He enjoyed sharing his experiences and wisdom with his colleagues. This was something he seemed to see as part of his role.

He took his work very seriously, yet he was a delightful companion whom one loved to spend time with. He had a very good sense of humor.

On one occasion, Mr. Mizutani; his secretary, Iseko Kano (叶 伊勢子); his wife, Chizuko Mizutani (水谷 千鶴子), who was visiting New York; and I had lunch together at an Italian restaurant in Manhattan. The waiter spoke to us in an affected Italian accent. Mr. Mizutani joked that with customers in restaurants like these, they “forget that they know English” (pretend that they don’t know it).

He was a very thoughtful and generous person, always doing little kindnesses, like leaving some Japanese pastries on my desk on a day when he left the New York office to return to Tokyo because he thought my sons would enjoy them.

We talked together about family and kids. He was modest about his family, but one could tell that he was very proud of them. I know he was delighted with his sons’ accomplishments, thrilled when his oldest son got married, and very pleased to become a grandfather, because he told me so. (As of the date of this writing, his widow, Chizuko Mizutani, has four grandchildren. See photo below.)

Mr. Mizutani loved to travel, and everything he saw seemed to interest him. One of the last conversations we had was about a trip he had made to Eastern Europe. He had taken a great interest in Bulgaria, a country I myself had once traveled to, and we were able to compare notes.

He liked to experience different cuisines, like a restaurant he introduced me to on Restaurant Row in Manhattan that featured Italian-Jewish cuisine. He was interested in sampling the food in Bulgaria.

He was very much a real, full, and accomplished person in the best sense.

I miss him very much.

 

 

— Roger W Smith

     January 2016

 

 

*************************************************

 

 

ロジャーW.スミス、「水谷栄二さんを偲んで」

 

掲載日 2016年1月4  掲載者Roger’s Gleanings

 

 

水谷栄二さんは、私がワトソン・ワイアット・ワールドワイドに務めていたころの同僚で、2006年1月30日に東京で亡くなった。

水谷さんは、ワイアット・カンパニーの東京支社のマネージャーだった。1990年代、彼は東京とニューヨークとに時間を振り分け、日米で日本の企業を対象にワイアット・カンパニーの事業を推進していた。

私は事業開発部に所属しており、水谷さんは日本のお客様担当として私を採用してくれようとしていた。

不運にも、これは実現しなかった。しかし水谷さんのおかげで、私は彼が飛行機のマイレージサービスを使って購入してくれた航空券で東京に出張させてもらうことができた。日本に行かせていただいた事を彼に感謝している。彼は私の日本訪問に強い興味を示し、何をし、何を見、誰と会うべきか、いろいろと助言してくれた。

私はニューヨークで水谷さんと、仕事でも私生活でもかなりの時間を一緒に過ごさせていただいた。

私は水谷さんを大変尊敬しており、深い敬愛の念を抱いている。彼は素晴らしい人だった。彼は知的で、ビジネス、言語、および一般知識にいたるまで、幅広い知識を持っていた。彼は多くのことに興味を持っていた。事実、彼はすべてのことに関心があるように見えた。私たちは、ビジネスからスポーツまで、様々なテーマについて話した。彼は熱烈なスポーツファンだった。

彼は子供の頃のこと、ベトナムとアメリカで受けた教育のことについて話してくれた。彼は素晴らしい学歴を持ちながらも謙虚な人だった。彼は子供時代の教育のほとんどをベトナムで受け、1950年代にアメリカの(インディアナ州だったと思う)の大学に通った。

彼は、日本語、英語、およびベトナム語の3ヶ国語に精通していた。彼の英語には非の打ち所が無かった。

彼は一度、ベトナム語を学ぶのは、中国語を学ぶよりも難しいと話してくれたことがあり、驚いたのと同時に、興味深かったことを覚えている。

水谷さんは親切な人だった。彼は人生を存分に楽しんでいるようだった。

彼は、彼の経験と知識を同僚と共有できることに喜びを感じていた。彼はこれを彼の職務の一環と考えているようだった。

彼は仕事にとても真剣に取り組むまじめな人だったが、誰もが一緒に時間を過ごしたいと思うような楽しい友人でもあった。彼には素晴らしいユーモアセンスがあった。

水谷さん、秘書の叶伊勢子さん、ニューヨークを訪れていた妻の水谷千鶴子さんと私とでマンハッタンのイタリア料理のレストランで昼食をとっていたときのこと。 ウェイターが偽物のイタリアンなまりの英語で私たちに話しかけてくると、水谷さんはすかさず、こういうレストランに来るお客さんの影響で、「ウェイターさんは英語が話せることを忘れてしまうのかな[英語が話せないふりをしている]」とジョークを飛ばした。

彼はとても思いやり深く、寛容な人だった。常にさりげない優しさを忘れず、彼が東京に戻る前のニューヨークオフィス最後の日にも、私の息子が喜ぶだろうから、と私のデスクに日本の菓子パンを置いていってくれたことがある。

私たちは家族や子供たちのことについても話した。彼は家族の事を褒めちぎるようなことはなかったが、内心はとても誇りに思っていることはよく分かった。彼は息子さんの成功をとても喜んでいること、ご長男が結婚されたときはとても感激したこと、そしておじいさんになったときはとてもうれしかったことを話してくれた。(このブログを執筆時、彼の未亡人・水谷千鶴子さんには4人のお孫さんがいる。(下の写真を参照してください)

水谷さんは旅行が大好きで、見たものすべてに興味を持つようだった。最後に交わした会話では、東ヨーロッパの旅行についても話した。彼はブルガリアにとても興味を持っていた。ブルガリアは私も訪れた事があり、互いの旅行記を比較しあった。

彼は異文化の食べ物を体験するのが好きで、彼が紹介してくれたマンハッタンの「Restaurant Row」ではユダヤ系イタリア料理を楽しむことができた。彼はブルガリアでも新しい食べ物に関心を示していた。

彼は最高の意味で、地に足の着いた、中身のある、洗練された人だった。

私は彼が居なくなってとても悲しい。

 

 

ロジャーW. スミス

      2016年1

 

 

*****************************************************

 

Chizuko Mizutani email of 11-14-2007

 

 

mizutani-grandchildren

Mr. Mizutani’s grandchildren

About Roger W. Smith

Roger W. Smith is a writer and independent scholar based in New York City. His experience includes freelance writing and editing, business writing, book reviewing, and the teaching of writing and literature as an adjunct professor. Mr. Smith's interests include personal essays and opinion pieces; American and world literature; culture, especially books and reading; current issues that involve social, moral, and philosophical views; and experiences of daily living from a ground level perspective. Besides (1) rogersgleanings.com, a personal site, he also hosts websites devoted to (2) the author Theodore Dreiser and (3) to the sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin.
This entry was posted in personal reminiscences of Roger W. Smith, tributes (written by Roger W. Smith) and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s