Category Archives: Tolstoy

an exchange re Tolstoy (and some things I learned) … plus, why it pays to keep one’s eye on others’ writing

 

 

Elisabeth van der Meer has a new post on her site about Russian literature, which I follow avidly.

“Tolstoy and Homer”

https://arussianaffair.wordpress.com/2017/09/21/tolstoy-and-homer/

 

Ms. van der Meer notes: “… Tolstoy considered himself equal to Homer. He was so obsessed with the classics, that he taught himself Ancient Greek in a mere couple of months when he was in his forties, so that he could read them in the original. You can find Homeric elements in all his literary works. I say elements and not influences, because they are not in the least bit contrived, far from it. They are the foundation of his writing, his natural instinct.”

 

We had the following exchange about her post.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   September 23, 2017

 

 

*****************************************************

 

This post is fascinating and very well put together, Elisabeth. Thank you.

The connections you make between the Iliad and the Odyssey and various Tolstoy works such as Hadji Murad and War and Peace are fascinating.

You note that Tolstoy “was so obsessed with the classics, that he taught himself Ancient Greek in a mere couple of months when he was in his forties, so that he could read them in the original.”

It is my understanding that he wished to learn Greek so that he could read the Gospels in the original. His writings about the Gospels can be seen in works such as “The Gospel in Brief, or A Short Exposition of the Gospel,” “The Four Gospels Unified and Translated,” and “What I Believe.”

You state that “Tolstoy may have been a pacifist, but he did like to write about war, often drawing from his own memories; he went to war in the Caucasus as a young man.” His descriptions of battles in his early works are incredible. I have read at least part of The Cossacks, but not Sevastopol Sketches.

I would like to comment on some specific observations/sentences of yours that I particularly enjoyed.

“You can find Homeric elements in all his literary works. I say elements and not influences, because they are not in the least bit contrived, far from it. They are the foundation of his writing, his natural instinct.

GREAT SENTENCE! BEAUTIFUL!

“Going to war for him was like going back to an ancient, primitive world, where men are one with their horses, and where pots are hissing and steaming above the fire at night.”

A GREAT SENTENCE BY YOU: “where men are one with their horses, and where pots are hissing and steaming above the fire at night.” Beautifully put.

“… no one can describe the moment of death quite the way Tolstoy can, but the blood streaming into the grass is pure Homer.”

BEAUTIFULLY PUT

I think I have made a similar comment about your prose before. You have a facility for writing sentences in which a general observation is beautifully yoked to a specific images/detail chosen by you to illustrate the point — the two get fused in compressed fashion in a sentence.

I am working on a post of my own about good writing. I hope to use some of this stuff of yours as illustrative examples.

 

 

*****************************************************

 

Thank you again, Roger.

About Tolstoy learning Greek, yes, I believe you’re right in saying that he wanted to read the Gospels in the original, but he wanted to read other classics too. Here’s a quote from Henri Troyat’s biography:

“He sent for a theological student from Moscow to teach him the rudiments of the language. From the first day, the forty-two-year-old pupil threw himself into Greek grammar with a passion, pored over dictionaries, drew up vocabularies, tackled the great authors. In spite of his headaches, he learned quickly. In a few weeks he had outdistanced his teacher. He sight-translated Xenophon, reveled in Homer, discovered Plato and said the originals were like “spring-water that sets the teeth on edge, full of sunlight and impurities and dust-motes that make it seem even more pure and fresh,” while translations of the same texts were as tasteless as “boiled, distilled water.” Sometimes he dreamed in Greek at night. He imagined himself living in Athens; as he tramped through the snow of Yasnaya Polyana, sinking in up to his calves, his head was filled with sun, marble and geometry. Watching him changing overnight into a Greek, his wife was torn between admiration and alarm. “There is clearly nothing in the world that interests him more or gives him greater pleasure than to learn a new Greek word or puzzle out some expression he has not met before,” she complained. “I have questioned several people, some of whom have taken their degree at the university. To hear them talk, Lyovochka has made unbelievable progress in Greek.” He himself felt rejuvenated by this diet of ancient wisdom. “Now I firmly believe,” he said to Fet, “that I shall write no more gossipy twaddle of the War and Peace type.”

It clearly became an obsession for him.

Thanks again for the compliments!

Regards, Elisabeth

 

 

*****************************************************

 

Elisabeth — The quote from Troyat’s biography (which I read a long time ago, and was totally immersed in; it pretty much made me into a Tolstoy enthusiast on its own) is great, and very informative. It is clear from the quote that his desire to learn Greek wasn’t simply to be able to read the Gospels in the original. My comment, therefore, while it adds pertinent information, was not quite on target.

If he was forty-two when he began studying Greek intensely, that would have been in around 1870. It seems that his spiritual conversion occurred a short while after this date, although one would have to study his biographies carefully to develop a cause and effect sequence. “A Short Exposition of the Gospel” and “The Four Gospels Unified and Translated” were published in 1881. “What I Believe” was published in 1884.

Not being a Tolstoy scholar, I am inclined to believe that you’re right. Perhaps it was the case that having studied Greek for other reasons, Tolstoy found it greatly advantageous to him when it came to studying the Gospels.

“Now I firmly believe,” he said to Fet, “that I shall write no more gossipy twaddle of the War and Peace type.”

This quote which you supplied from Troyat, shows that the influence of the Greek epics on him was primarily literary — i.e., his admiration for them as literature — and would seem to imply that the added benefit of being able to read the Gospels in the original was an extra bonus.

If you know more, or find out more, please keep me informed.

 

 

*****************************************************

 

I shall certainly do that. Although I recall reading that his desire to study the gospels inspired him to learn Greek. It probably went as you say. I shall look into it when I’m home again.

Thanks, Roger!

Roger W. Smith, “биографический очерк Льва Николаевича Толстого” (“biographical sketch of Leo Tolstoy”; in Russian)

 

 

Смотри ниже

 

 

****************************************************************

 

This brief biographical sketch of Leo Tolstoy was written by me for a Russian class at New York University in the 1970’s.

My student essay, in its original form, has been posted by me on this site at

https://rogersgleanings.com/2016/05/08/my-russian-essay-on-tolstoy/

 

 

****************************************************************

 

 Roger W. Smith, “БИОГРАФИЧЕСКИЙ ОЧЕРК ЛЬВА НИКОЛАЕВИЧА ТОЛСТОГО”

 

ЛЕВ НИКОЛАЕВИЧ ТОЛСТОЙ БЫЛ ВЕЛИКИМ РУССКИМ ПИСАТЕЛЕМ. РОДИЛСЯ ОН ДЕВЯТОГО СЕНТЯБРЯ В 1828 ГОДА И ВЫРОС ОН В РОССИИ , ЯСНАЯ ПОЛЯНА — ТАК НАЗЫВАЛОСЬ ЕГО ВОЗЛЮБЛЕННОЕ ПОМЕСТЬЕ, В КОТОРОМ ОН ПРОВЁЛ БОЛЬШУЮ ЧАСТЬ СВОЕЙ ЖИЗНИ. ЯСНАЯ ПОЛЯНА НАХОДИЛАСЬ НА РАССТОЯНИИ СТА ТРИДЦАТИ КИЛОМЕТРОВ ОТ МОСКВЫ (В ТЕ ВРЕМЕНА, ПУТЕШЕСТВИЕ В МОСКВУ ЗАНИМАЛО ЧЕТЫРЕ ДНЯ).

МАТЬ ЛЬВА ТОЛСТОГО УМЕРЛА КОГДА ЕМУ БЫЛ ВСЕГО ГОД, А ОТЕЦ УМЕР КОГДА ЕМУ БЫЛО ВОСЕМЬ ЛЕТ И ПОЭТОМУ ЕГО ВОСПИТЫВАЛИ ТЕТКИ. В ОБЩЕМ ЛЕВОЧКА, ТАК ЕГО ЧАСТО НАЗЫВАЛИ, БЫЛ ЗАДУМЧИВЫМ И ЧУВСТВИТЕЛЬНЫМ МАЛЬЧИКОМ. ОН НЕ БЫЛ ХОРОШИМ УЧЕНИКОМ. ОН УЧИЛСЯ ДОМА У ГУВЕРНЁРОВ, А КОГДА ЕМУ БЫЛО ШЕСТНАДЦАТЬ ЛЕТ ОН ПОСТУПИЛ В КАЗАНСКИЙ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ. СНАЧАЛА ОН СПЕЦИАЛИЗИРОВАЛСЯ НА ВОСТОЧНЫХ ЯЗЫКАХ, А ПОТОМ ОН ПЕРЕКЛЮЧИЛСЯ НА ИЗУЧЕНИЕ ПРАВА. ОН НЕ ЗАКОНЧИЛ УНИВЕРСИТЕТА ПОНЯВ ЧТО ОН ПРЕДПОЧИТАЕТ САМООБРАЗОВАНИЕ И БРОСИЛ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ.

У ЛЬВА ТОЛСТОГО БЫЛО ТРИ БРАТА (ЛЕВ НИКОЛАЕВИЧ БЫЛ МЛАДШИМ БРАТОМ). ОДИН ИЗ ЕГО БРАТЬЕВ НИКОЛАЙ НИКОЛАЕВИЧ, СЛУЖИЛ В АРМИИ. ОН БЫЛ ОФИЦЕРОМ НА КАВКАЗЕ, ГДЕ ЦАРСКАЯ АРМИЯ СРАЖАЛАСЬ С ТУЗЕМНЫМИ НАРОДАМИ. ТОЛСТОЙ ПОЕХАЛ НА КАВКАЗ СО СВОИМ БРАТОМ, ХОТЯ ОН НЕ СЛУЖИЛ В АРМИИ. ПОЗЖЕ ОН СТАЛ ОФИЦЕРОМ И БЫЛ НЕСКОЛЬКО РАЗ РАНЕН. В МОЛОДОСТИ ТОЛСТОЙ ЗАВЁЛ ДНЕВНИК И КОГДА ОН БЫЛ НА КАВКАЗЕ ОН ПРОДОЛЖАЛ ПИСАТЬ В СВОЁМ ДНЕВНИКЕ. ОН ТАКЖЕ ЗАКОНЧИЛ РАБОТАТЬ НАД СВОИМ ПЕРВЫМ ПРОИЗВЕДЕНИЕМ ПОД НАЗВАНИЕМ “ДЕТСТВО”. В ЭТОМ РОМАНЕ ТОЛСТОЙ ОПИСАЛ СВОИ ВПЕЧАТЛЕНИЯ О СВОЁМ ДЕТСТВЕ И О СВОЕЙ СЕМЕЙНОЙ ЖИЗНИ. КОГДА ОН ЗАКОНЧИЛ ПОСЛЕДНЮЮ ЧАСТЬ РОМАНА “ДЕТСТВО”, ТОЛСТОЙ НАПИСАЛ ЧАСТЬ СВОЕГО ПРОИЗВЕДЕНИЯ В ИЗВЕСТНОМ ЖУРНАЛЕ “СОВРЕМЕННИК”, В КОТОРОМ ОНО БЫЛО ОПУБЛИКОВАНО. “ДЕТСТВО” ИМЕЛО ОШЕЛОМЛЯЮЩИЙ УСПЕХ, ЧИТАТЕЛИ ХВАЛИЛИ ЕГО ПРОИЗВЕДЕНИЕ. ТОЛСТОЙ ПОДПИСАЛ СВОЙ РОМАН ТРЕМЯ ЗАГЛАВНЫМИ БУКВАМИ Т. Л.Н. ПОЭТОМУ ЕЩЁ НИКТО НЕ ЗНАЛ ПОЛНОЕ ИМЯ АВТОРА. ТОЛСТОЙ ПРИНЯЛ УЧАСТИЕ В ОБОРОНЕ СЕВАСТОПОЛЯ И ЭТОТ ВОЕННЫЙ ОПЫТ ДАЛ ЕМУ ИДЕЮ НАПИСАТЬ МНОГО РАССКАЗОВ. ОДИН ИЗ НИХ НАЗЫВАЛСЯ “НАБЕГ”.

ВЫЙДЯ В ОТСТАВКУ ОТ ВОЕННОЙ СЛУЖБЫ, ОН ПОЕХАЛ В ПЕТЕРБУРГ, ГДЕ ЕГО СЕРДЕЧНО ПРИНЯЛИ В ЛИТЕРАТУРНЫХ КРУГАХ. “ДЕТСТВО” ОЧЕНЬ ПОНРАВИЛОСЬ ДРУГОМУ ОЧЕНЬ ВЫДАЮЩЕМУСЯ РУССКОМУ ПИСАТЕЛЮ ИВАНУ СЕРГЕЕВИЧУ ТУРГЕНЕВУ (1818 Г. – (1883 Г.). ТУРГЕНЕВ ПРИЗНАЛ ТАЛАНТ ТОЛСТОГО И ОНИ КРЕПКО ПОДРУЖИЛИСЬ. НО ПОТОМ ОНИ ЧАСТО ССОРИЛИСЬ ПОТОМУ ЧТО АРИСТОКРАТИЧЕСКОЕ ПРОИСХОЖДЕНИЕ ТУРГЕНЕВА РАЗДРАЖАЛО ТОЛСТОГО. И МЕЖДУ НИМИ ВОЗНИК РАЗРЫВ НА ЭТОЙ ПОЧВЕ. ТОЛСТОЙ ДАЖЕ ВЫЗВАЛ ТУРГЕНЕВА НА ДУЭЛЬ.

ТОЛСТОЙ МНОГО ПУТЕШЕСТВОВАЛ ПО ЕВРОПЕ, А ПОТОМ ОН ВЕРНУЛСЯ В ЯСНУЮ ПОЛЯНУ, ГДЕ ОН НЕ ЗНАЛ ЧЕМУ ПОСВЯТИТЬ СВОЮ ЖИЗНЬ. ОН УПРАВЛЯЛ СВОИМ ПОМЕСТЬЕМ И ЗАНИМАЛСЯ УЛУЧШЕНИЕМ УСЛОВИЙ ЖИЗНИ ДЛЯ КРЕСТЬЯН. ОН ОСНОВАЛ ШКОЛУ ДЛЯ КРЕСТЬЯНСКИХ ДЕТЕЙ.

В ТЫСЯЧА ВОСЕМЬСОТ ШЕСТЬДЕСЯТ ВТОРОМ ГОДУ (1862Г.) ТОЛСТОЙ ЖЕНИЛСЯ НА СОФИИ АНДРЕЕВНЕ БЕРС. ОНА БЫЛА ОДНОЙ ИЗ ТРЁХ СЕСТЁР ДВОРЯНСКОЙ СЕМЬИ ЖИВУЩЕЙ В МОСКВЕ. ТОЛСТОМУ ТОГДА БЫЛО ТРИДЦАТЬ ДВА ГОДА, А ЕГО ЖЕНЕ СОФИИ АНДРЕЕВНЕ БЫЛО ТОЛЬКО ВОСЕМНАДЦАТЬ ЛЕТ. СНАЧАЛА ИХ БРАК БЫЛ ОЧЕНЬ СЧАСТЛИВЫМ. СОФИЯ АНДРЕЕВНА БЫЛА ВЕРНОЙ ЖЕНОЙ. ГОВОРЯТ, ЧТО ОНА ПЕРЕПИСЫВАЛА МАНУСКРИПТ “ВОЙНЫ И МИРА” СЕМЬ РАЗ.

КРОМЕ РОМАНОВ, ТОЛСТОЙ БЫЛ АВТОРОМ ВСЯКОГО РОДА ПРОИЗВЕДЕНИЙ. Он ПИСАЛ ДЕТСКУЮ ЛИТЕРАТУРУ, НАРОДНЫЕ РАССКАЗЫ, И ПЬЕСЫ. ОДНАКО, ОН НЕ ЛЮБИЛ ПИСАТЬ ПОЭЗИЮ.

ПОСЛЕ ТОГО КАК, ОН НАПИСАЛ “ВОЙНУ И МИР” И “АННУ КАРЕНИНУ,” В ЖИЗНИ ТОЛСТОГО БЫЛ ПЕРИОД БОЛЬШОГО РЕЛИГИОЗНОГО СОМНЕНИЯ. ОН ЗАКОНЧИЛСЯ ТЕМ, ЧТО ОН ПОКИНУЛ ПРАВОСЛАВИЕ И КРИТИКОВАЛ ЕГО В СВОИХ ПИСАНИЯХ (В ПОСЛЕДСТВИИ ТОЛСТОЙ ОТЛУЧИЛСЯ ОТ ЦЕРКВИ).

ТОЛСТОЙ НАПИСАЛ ФИЛОСОФИЧЕСКИЕ ПРОИЗВЕДЕНИЯ “ИСПОВЕДИ” (1880 Г.); “В ЧЕМ МОЯ ВЕРА” (1884 Г.) И “ТАК ЧТО ЖЕ НАМ ДЕЛАТЬ?” (1884 Г.) ОН ТАКЖЕ НАПИСАЛ КНИГУ “ЧТО ТАКОЕ ИСКУССТВО”, В КОТОРЫХ ОН ОТВЕРГНУЛ ВСЯКУЮ ФОРМУ ИСКУССТВА, КОТОРАЯ НЕ ПРИНОСИЛА ПОЛЬЗЫ ОБЫЧНЫМ ЛЮДЯМ. ОН ПРЕЗИРАЛ ХУДОЖНИКОВ, КОТОРЫЕ СОЗДАВАЛИ ПРОИЗВЕДЕНИЯ ДЛЯ ЗНАТОКОВ.

ТОЛСТОЙ ПРОПОВЕДОВАЛ ЧИСТУЮ ФОРМУ ХРИСТИАНСТВА, СОВЕРШЕННО В СООТВЕТСВТИИ С УЧЕНИЕМ ХРИСТОВА. ГЛАВНОЕ ПРАВИЛО ФИЛОСОФИИ ТОЛСТОГО – СЛЕПОЕ ПОВИНОВАНИЕ ЗЛУ. ОН ПЫТАЛСЯ ПРОЩЕ ЖИТЬ, ОН ОТКАЗАЛСЯ ОТ СВОЕГО БОГАТСТВА (ИЛИ, ПО КРАЙНЕЙ МЕРЕ, ЧАСТЬ ЕГО). НО ЕГО ЖЕНА, ПРИВЫЧНАЯ К РОСКОШНОЙ ЖИЗНИ НЕ ПОНИМАЛА ЕГО, И БЫЛА ПРОТИВ ЕГО ФИЛОСОФИИ.

В ИТОГЕ ИДЕИ ТОЛСТОГО ПРИВЛЕКЛИ ПРИВЕРЖЕНЦЕВ; УЧЕНИКИ ЕГО ФИЛОСОФИИ И ЕГО ОБРАЗА ЖИЗНИ НАЗЫВАЛИСЬ “ТОЛСТОВЦАМИ”, А ЕГО ФИЛОСОФИЯ НАЗЫВАЛАСЬ “ТОЛСТОВСТВО”. ГЛАВНЫЙ УЧЕНИК ЛЬВА ТОЛСТОГО БЫЛ ЧЕРТКОВ. ОН ОКАЗЫВАЛ БОЛЬШОЕ ВЛИЯНИЕ НА ТОЛСТОГО, И ЧАСТО УПРЕКАЛ ЕГО, ТАК КАК ОН ПО ЕГО МНЕНИЮ НЕ ВСЕГДА БЫЛ ВЕРЕН СВОИМ ИДЕЯМ. В ТО ВРЕМЯ, КАК ДРУЖБА.

МЕЖДУ ЧЕРТКОВЫМ И ТОЛСТЫМ СТАНОВИЛАСЬ ВСЕ КРЕПЧЕ, ОТНОШЕНИЯ МЕЖДУ ТОЛСТЫМ И ЕГО ЖЕНОЙ СТАНОВИЛИСь ВСЕ ХУЖЕ. СОФЬЯ АНДРЕЕВНА СТАЛА РЕВНОВАТЬ СВОЕГО МУЖА К ЧЕРТКОВУ. ОНИ СПОРИЛИ ДРУГ С ДРУГОМ О ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВЕ СОЧИНЕНИЙ ТОЛСТОГО (ТОЛСТОЙ ОТРЕКСЯ ОТ ПОЛУЧЕНИЯ ПРИБЫЛИ ОТ СВОИХ СОЧИНЕНИЙ).

В ПОСЛЕДНЕМ ГОДУ Своей ЖИЗНИ, В ВОЗРАСТЕ ВОСЬМИДЕСЯТИ ДВУХ ЛЕТ, ТОЛСТОЙ УЕХАЛ ИЗ ЯСНОЙ ПОЛЯНЫ. ГЛАВНАЯ причина УХОДА была – ССОРА МЕЖДУ ТОЛСТЫМ И ЕГО ЖЕНОЙ. ОН ПОНЯЛ ЧТО ОН НЕ МоЖЕТ БОЛЬШЕ ЖИТЬ СО СВОЕЙ ЖЕНОЙ.

ТОЛСТОЙ МЕЧТАЛ ПРОВЕСТИ оставшуюся ЧАСТЬ Своей ЖИЗНИ В ТИХОМ ПРОСТОМ МЕСТЕ – МОЖЕТ БЫТЬ В МОНАСТЫРЕ ИЛИ В ИЗБЕ, НО ВО ВРЕМЯ ПОЕЗДКИ – В ПОЕЗДЕ – ОН ЗАБОЛЕЛ. ЕГО высадили ИЗ ПОЕЗДА НА СТАНЦИИ АСТАПОВО, где ОН СКОНЧАЛСЯ В ДОМЕ НАЧАЛЬНИКА СТАНЦИИ.

КОНЧина Толстого БЫЛа ОЧЕНЬ ПЕЧАЛЬНА. ЕГО ЖЕНА ПОЕХАЛА НА СТАНЦИЮ И БЫЛА ТАМ В ТЕЧЕНИЕ ПОСЛЕДНИХ ДНЕЙ его жизни, Но ЕЙ НЕ РАЗРЕШИЛИ ВИДЕТЬ МУЖА. ДО ПОСЛЕДНИХ МИНУТ – Врачи БОЯЛИСЬ, ЧТО Когда он УВИДИТ свою жену ему станет хуже. ЛЕВ НИКОЛАЕВИЧ ТОЛСТОЙ УМЕР двадцатого ноября тысяча девятьсот десятого года (1910 года) ТАК И НЕ ПОПРОЩАВШИСЬ СО СВОЕЙ ЖЕНОЙ. СОФЬЯ АНДРЕЕВНА ТОЛСТАЯ УМЕРЛА В ТЫСЯЧА ДЕВЯТЬСОТ ДЕВЯТНАДЦАТОГО ГОДА (1919).

 

Leo Tolstoy and wife; photo and portraits

 

 

spring

 

In springtime, the only pretty ring time,

When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding;

Sweet lovers love the spring.

 

— William Shakespeare (from As You Like It)

 

 

***********************************************

 

 

Как ни старались люди, собравшись в одно небольшое место несколько сот тысяч, изуродовать ту землю, на которой они жались, как ни забивали камнями землю, чтобы ничего не росло на ней, как ни счищали всякую пробивающуюся травку, как ни дымили каменным углем и нефтью, как ни обрезывали деревья и ни выгоняли всех животных и птиц, — весна была весною даже и в городе.  Солнце грело, трава, оживая, росла и зеленела везде, где только не соскребли ее, не только на газонах бульваров, но и между плитами камней, и березы, тополи, черемуха распускали свои клейкие и пахучие листья, липы надували лопавшиеся почки; галки, воробьи и голуби по-весеннему радостно готовили уже гнезда, и мухи жужжали у стен, пригретые солнцем. Веселы были и растения, и птицы, и насекомые, и дети. Но люди — большие, взрослые люди — не переставали обманывать и мучать себя и друг друга. Люди считали, что священно и важно не это весеннее утро, не эта красота мира божия, данная для блага всех существ, — красота, располагающая к миру, согласию и любви, а священно и важно то, что они сами выдумали, чтобы властвовать друг над другом.

 

ЛЕВ НИКОЛАЕВИЧ ТОЛСТОЙ, воскрешение (1899), Часть первая, глава первая

 

 

Though hundreds of thousands had done their very best to disfigure the small piece of land on which they were crowded together, by paving the ground with stones, scraping away every vestige of vegetation, cutting down the trees, turning away birds and beasts, and filling the air with the smoke of naphtha and coal, still spring was spring, even in the town. The sun shone warm, the air was balmy; everywhere, where it did not get scraped away, the grass revived and sprang up between the paving-stones as well as on the narrow strips of lawn on the boulevards. The birches, the poplars, and the wild cherry unfolded their gummy and fragrant leaves, the limes were expanding their opening buds; crows, sparrows, and pigeons, filled with the joy of spring, were getting their nests ready; the flies were buzzing along the walls, warmed by the sunshine. All were glad, the plants, the birds, the insects, and the children. But men, grown-up men and women, did not leave off cheating and tormenting themselves and each other. It was not this spring morning men thought sacred and worthy of consideration not the beauty of God’s world, given for a joy to all creatures, this beauty which inclines the heart to peace, to harmony, and to love, but only their own devices for enslaving one another.

 

— Leo Tolstoy, Resurrection (1899), Part One, Chapter One; translated by Louise Maude (italics added)

 

***********************************************

 

See photographs of New York City in the spring, below.  Also posted here is Thomas Morley’s song (set to Shakespeare) “It was a lover and his lass.”

 

–posted by Roger W. Smith

    April 2016

 

 

*****************************************************

 

 

*****************************************************

 

photographs taken in Queens and Manhattan, NYC, April 2016, by Roger W. Smith

 

 IMG_4195.JPG
Woodside, Queens, May 22, 2016 (taken by Roger).JPG
IMG_3800.JPG
IMG_2606.JPG
IMG_5875.JPG
IMG_4305.JPG