Sibelius, “Se’n har jag ej frågat mera”

 

 

 

 

Posted here is a song by Jean Sibelius: “Se’n har jag ej frågat mera” (Since then I have enquired no further).

The text is by Johan Ludvig Runeberg (1804-1877). Runeberg was a Finno-Swedish lyric and epic poet. He is the national poet of Finland.

Completed in 1891-1892, this song was included in Sibelius’s Seven Songs, Op. 17. It is performed here beautifully by Swedish mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   June 2018

 

 

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TEXT – Finnish

 

Se’n har jag ej frågat mera

Varför är så flyktig våren,

varför dröjer sommarn icke?

Så jag tänkte fordom ofta,

frågte, utan svar, av mången.

Se’n den älskade mig svikit,

se’n till köld hans värme blivit,

all hans sommar blivit vinter,

se’n har jag ej frågat mera,

Känt blott djupt uti mitt sinne, att det sköna är förgängligt,

att det ljuva icke dröjer.

 

 

 

TEXT – English

 

Since Then I Have Questioned No Further

Why is springtime so brief,

Why does summer not tarry?

This before I often wondered,

Asked – without reply – of many.
Since the one I loved betrayed me,
Since to ice his ardour turned,
All his summer turned to winter,
Since then I have questioned no further,
Only felt, deep in my heart,
That the beautiful is transient, The delightful does not last.

About Roger W. Smith

Roger W. Smith is a writer and independent scholar based in New York City. His experience includes freelance writing and editing, business writing, book reviewing, and the teaching of writing and literature as an adjunct professor. Mr. Smith's interests include personal essays and opinion pieces; American and world literature; culture, especially books and reading; classical music; current issues that involve social, moral, and philosophical views; and experiences of daily living from a ground level perspective. Besides (1) rogersgleanings.com, a personal site, he also hosts websites devoted to (2) the author Theodore Dreiser and (3) to the sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin.
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